I Heart Pink in a Parade

 

 

 

The 2011 Azalea Festival Parade, held annually in Wilmington, North Carolina, had a plethora of pink in it. And for good reason, y’all; azalea’s come in all shades of pink.  Everyone was wearing it – even the clowns. This one, with his pink-mobile, his pink feathers and his pink poodle, really got into the spirit!

This week’s photo challenge theme at I Heart Faces is “Tickled Pink!” I think the expression on this clown’s face captures the emotion perfectly.

I Heart Faces is a photography sharing forum that focuses on the art of capturing faces and their various emotions. Each week, people from across the world enter their favorite face photos.

Click on the picture for a better view and click the button to check out lots of other interesting hands, or to enter a photo of your own.

 

Shadow Shot Sunday – Oak Trees

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I started a new blog, called Wilmington Daily Photo. I post a picture daily, of my beautiful, historic, riverfront hometown of Wilmington, NC. This is to participate in The City Daily Photo, which showcases photos of cities all over the world. Nobody was doing Wilmington, and I have a TON of good photos, so I thought, “Why not?”

And I love to log onto The City Daily Photo and see my daily picture of little old Wilmington, NC, right next to the likes of Paris, France, Kuching Malaysia, or Hove, UK. Pretty cool, huh?

So now, everywhere I go, I’m on the hunt for a picture. Because having to have something to post everyday is a daunting task, y’all. In this shot, I was riding in the car, trying to get a shot of some of the old homes downtown. Wilmington has a lot of centuries old oak trees and the shadows they cast are wonderful.

shadow-shot-sunday-logo11Shadow Shot Sunday is a cool idea for a meme that has folks posting photos of shadows, and then linking back to Hey Harriet’s blog so everyone can visit each others pictures. (And leave comments -it’s the blogger’s crack.)

Egret (Macro Monday)

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This picture is for Macro Monday, a photo meme hosted by Lisa’s Chaos. It’s real easy to play, y’all. You take a close up picture that you think is blog-worthy, post it, and link back to Macro Monday so everyone can visit everyone! (That’s southeren-eese for leave each other comments, if you know what’s good for ya.)

This is an egret that was standing in our backyard, by our pond. Another close up that  husband took with his nifty zoom lens.

Macro Monday

Macro Monday

Shadow Shot Sunday – My Paradise

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I’m a lucky gal. This is what I get to see when I look out my back door.  Just another day in Paradise, y’all!

shadow-shot-sunday-logo11This is for Shadow Shot Sunday, a cool idea for a meme that has folks posting photos of shadows, and then linking back to Hey Harriet’s blog so everyone can visit each others pictures. (And leave comments – the blogger’s crack.)

Baby Ducks (Macro Monday)

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This picture is for Macro Monday. It’s real easy to play, y’all. You take a close up picture that you think is blog-worthy, post it, and link back to Macro Monday so everyone can visit everyone! (That’s southeren-ese for leave each other comments, if you know what’s good for ya.)

Baby ducks are the first signs of spring. These ducks wandered through our yard . We used a zoom lens to get this picture.

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The Sun Sets Over Downtown Wilmington, NC

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This is for Family Foto Fun Friday, hosted by Diana at Diana Rambles. She puts up a new theme each week, and you can submit your photo that fits the theme on your blog, along with any explanation that you want to add. You can use a photo you took in the past, a photo taken by other family members, or a photo taken during the week to fit the theme. You may link a previous blog post if it fits the theme. The best part is – anyone can participate!

This week’s theme is “Sun.” I immediately thought of this picture that my youngest son, Klinton, took in downtown Wilmington, NC.  Since I admittedly stole this picture off of one of his social networking pages, y’all leave a comment to tell him how great it is, so maybe he’ll forgive his snoopy old Momma.

Bathing Beauties in the Fifties

There’s this thing I found, called Wordless Wednesday (WW, for short), y’all. The rules are real simple, if you want to play. Just post a picture, on Wednesday! Only thing is, it’s gotten so gosh dern popular – it’s every day now. So I’ve decided to hop on the “Thursday Edition”  bus.

Of course, bein’ southern and all sort of precludes me from bein’ completely wordless. Just thought y’all’d like to know that this here picture is of my mom, on the far left, with her cousins and sister, taken sometime around 1950, in Myrtle Beach, SC.

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Southern Collards

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OK, y’all. This week’s Spin Cycle is supposed to be a poem.  This one is almost impossible for me, because I practically cut my teeth on poems. My beloved grandmother, who passed on October 23 of last year, was a prolific poet and artist. I already have posted  several of her poems on my blog. And, since my life’s goal was to be exactly like her, I started writing poetry when I was about nine years old. In searching through my archives of poems, both hers and mine, I finally decided on this one.

Being able to cook up a good mess of collards is the number one requirement of being a true southern cook, y’all. This poem is, I think, the last one my grandmother ever wrote. I found this hand written copy, dated May 2007, tucked away in one of her journals – the writing scribbled and hard to read, due to her failing eyesight. It is about one of her’s (and mine) favorite things….collard greens.

I think I know what inspired her to write this poem. My Aunt Barbara, who was was my grandmother’s daughter-in-law, and refered to as her “adopted daughter” in this poem, remarried a man named Benny, after my uncle died.  Benny, who is from Pennsylvania, never ate a collard green in his life, until he married Barbara and moved down south. He loved them so much, that he decided to try and grow them in his backyard.

Barbara, being one of those southern gals who’d rather spend the day shopping at Dillards than slaving away over the hot stove, had no idea how to cook them. So she did what all us southern women do in a pinch. She called up her southern mama, “Miss Gladys.”

This poem is the answer she got.

Southern Collards

By Gladys Parker
May 2007

When I was forty or so
And you were my daughter, adopted you know
I would don my apron the old fashioned way
Because you were coming for Mother’s Day.

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Here’s the collard patch, right outside
It looks a little country-fied
But, begging your pardon,
I like my garden.

The collards were cropped, a leaf off each one.
It makes them grow better – they get big in the sun.
Summer collards are okay to eat,
But winter collards are tender and sweet.

The pot is boiling with a streak of lean.
(Slab bacon, maybe, is what I mean.)
When the meat is tender the fork will tell.
Each leaf examined and cleaned very well.

Now, twist each leaf half in two
Place in the pot, like good cooks do
Cook ‘til tender and seasoned to taste
Drain – nothing goes to waste.

Even the “pot liquor” is good for you.
Or corn meal dumplings, cooked like I do.
So chop up the greens nice and fine
And they will taste just like mine.